Fracking for oil and gas poses an impending health crisis

A report, by Concerned Health Professionals of New York and Physicians for Social Responsibility, pulls together studies, data and news reports on the health and environmental impacts of hydraulic fracturing of natural gas and oil wells. In fracking, a slurry of water, chemicals and sand is injected deep underground at drilling sites. The chemicals and chemical-laced wastewater can contaminate drinking water and send hazardous emissions into the air, endangering people who live nearby, as well as workers at drilling sites.

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We are not going away Mr Clark; we are ready, are you?

Once again we see the Government misleading the public, who I thought they were elected to serve, by refusing the release a Cabinet office report on fracking “as it would call into question the industry’s viability”. Surely the population, and particularly those whose lives would be affected by this industry, have a right to know just how viable this industry is bearing in mind the anguish that this industry will bring with it?

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Government ‘running out of time’ to deliver green Brexit

I have looked at tourism and the loss of jobs in the tourism industry that Fracking would bring, the costs to our police forces of the totally over the top policing of anti- Fracking protests.

I have looked again at plastic pollution and Mr Goves’ statement re ’Environmental Vandalism’ yet the pursuit of shale gas to make yet more plastic continues, environmental vandalism beyond belief.

I have looked at the former Chief Executive of NPOWERs’ comments that ‘Fracking as a solution falls into the fantasy basket’ and the failure of other European countries to make a success of Fracking, most having banned or abandoned it.

I have looked at our farmers complaining once again about the tactics of INEOS.

The evidence is there Mr Clark. The time is now, there can be no more delay.

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Bottled Water, Brought to You by Fracking?

There is a growing international awareness that plastic is a serious problem. In 2016, about 4 billion pounds of plastic were used in the bottled water business, and most of those bottles are not recycled—meaning they often end up in landfills or as litter. There’s also the matter of whether we should be putting our drinking water in those bottles in the first place: The most common packaging (polyethylene terephthalate, or PET) includes compounds like benzene, and the bottles can leach toxins like formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

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“It is like a puncture in your car – occasionally you get a puncture and occasionally we have an accident in chemicals.” – Jim Ratcliffe, INEOS

Jim Ratcliffe about the environmental record (and the environment)… “It is like a puncture in your car – occasionally you get a puncture and occasionally we have an accident in chemicals.” The “symbiotic relationship between the local community and the chemical plant” is important because “occasionally things go wrong and you need, they need, you know we need their sort of sympathy from time to time”….

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No government information on shale gas employment, flow back waste or treatment methods.

Ms Perry threw the potential of UK shale into doubt just weeks after Greg Clark, the Business Secretary, put the brakes on Third Energy’s plans to frack a well near Kirby Misperton in North Yorkshire. Development was halted to undertake financial checks on the company, which was four months late in publishing its accounts.

“The secretary of state has not made any new estimates for the period to 2025,” Ms Perry said in response to a written parliamentary question from Caroline Lucas, a Green Party MP.

The meagre 155-well estimate itself falls well below early claims that 4,000 wells would emerge by 2032 to bring a multibillion-pound investment boom to the UK, including 64,000 new jobs.

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Fracking revolt grows stronger in Derbyshire

Hundreds of people marched on a noisy and colourful Not for Shale anti-fracking protest through the North Derbyshire countryside last Saturday. The march went from the village of Clowne to Bolsover. It was a further impressive demonstration of the deep roots the anti-fracking movement has in our communities.

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